Learn More: Race & Ethnicity

The Race & Ethnicity dataset includes the following eight variables: American Indian/Native Population, Asian Population, Black Population, Hispanic Population, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander Population, Other Race Population, Population of Two or More Races, and White Population. Below is a chart showing percentages of the population by race and ethnicity across five selected neighborhoods.
Browse this Learn More page to see this dataset's metadata and why each of its variables are important to measure.

Trends in the Data

Metadata

Variable Definitions:
American Indian/Native Population: The percentage of the population who identifies as Non-Hispanic American Indian/Native
Asian Population: The percentage of the population who identifies as Non-Hispanic Asian
Black Population: The percentage of the population who identifies as Non-Hispanic Black
Hispanic Population: The percentage of the population (of any race) who identifies as Hispanic
Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander Population: The percentage of the population that identifies as Non-Hispanic Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander
Other Race Population: The percentage of the population that identifies as Non-Hispanic and "Other Race"
Population of Two or More Races: The percentage of the population identifies as Non-Hispanic and two or more races
White Population: The percentage of the population who identifies as Non-Hispanic White
Source:
American Community Survey, 5-year estimates, Table B03002
Years Available:
2006-10, 2007-11, 2008-12, 2009-13, 2010-14, 2011-15
Geographic Unit:
Census Tract

Why are these Variables Important to Measure?

American Indian/Native Population
The Census Bureau defines "American Indian/Native" as "a person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment. It includes people who indicate their race as 'American Indian or Alaska Native' or report entries such as Navajo, Blackfeet, Inupiat, Yup'ik, Central American Indian groups, or South American Indian groups." 
The racial classifications used by the Census Bureau reflect a social definition of race recognized in the United States, not a biological, anthropological, or genetic definition. Furthermore, the Census definitions include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. While people may choose more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, all individuals in this classification have selected only "American Indian/Native" as their race. When asked whether or not they were of Hispanic ethnicity, all people in this classification indicated that they were of Non-Hispanic ethnicity.
Information on race and ethnicity is often required for Federal programs and equal employment opportunities. Furthermore, measuring racial disparity is an important tool for policymakers in many areas including health, employment and income, and education. 
Asian Population
The Census Bureau defines "Asian" as "a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam."
The racial classifications used by the Census Bureau reflect a social definition of race recognized in the United States, not a biological, anthropological, or genetic definition. Furthermore, the Census definitions include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. While people may choose more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, all individuals in this classification have selected only "Asian" as their race.  When asked whether or not they were of Hispanic ethnicity, all people in this classification indicated that they were of Non-Hispanic ethnicity.
Information on race and ethnicity is often required for Federal programs and equal employment opportunities. Furthermore, measuring racial disparity is an important tool for policymakers in many areas including health, employment and income, and education.
Black Population
The Census Bureau defines "Black/African American" as "a person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa. It includes people who indicate their race as 'Black' or 'African American' or report entries such as African American, Kenyan, Nigerian, or Haitian."
The racial classifications used by the Census Bureau reflect a social definition of race recognized in the United States, not a biological, anthropological, or genetic definition. Furthermore, the Census definitions include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. While people may choose more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, all individuals in this classification have selected only "Black/African American" as their race. When asked whether or not they were of Hispanic ethnicity, all people in this classification indicated that they were of Non-Hispanic ethnicity.
Information on race and ethnicity is often required for Federal programs and equal employment opportunities. Furthermore, measuring racial disparity is an important tool for policymakers in many areas including health, employment and income, and education. Information on race and ethnicity is often required for Federal programs and equal employment opportunities. Furthermore, measuring racial disparity is an important tool for policymakers in many areas including health, employment and income, and education.
Hispanic Population
The ethnicities of "Hispanic," "Latino," and "Spanish" are used interchangeably and can include people from any race. Some people may identify with more than one of these terms. Within the "Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish" ethnicity, there are specific categories listed in the Census questionnaire such as Mexican, Puerto Rican, or Cuban. Individuals identifying as another Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin outside of those categories could have Dominican, Salvadoran, Guatemalan, Argentinean, Colombian, Spaniard, or other Spanish cultures or origins.
The racial classifications used by the Census Bureau reflect a social definition of race recognized in the United States, not a biological, anthropological, or genetic definition. Furthermore, the Census definitions include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups.
Information on race and ethnicity is often required for Federal programs and equal employment opportunities. Furthermore, measuring racial disparity is an important tool for policymakers in many areas including health, employment and income, and education.
Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander Population
The Census Bureau defines "Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander" as "a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. It includes people who indicate their race as Native Hawaiian, Guamanian or Chamorro, Samoan, and Other Pacific Islander, or provide other detailed Pacific Islander responses."
The racial classifications used by the Census Bureau reflect a social definition of race recognized in the United States, not a biological, anthropological, or genetic definition. Furthermore, the Census definitions include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. While people may choose more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, all individuals in this classification have selected only "Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander" as their race. When asked whether or not they were of Hispanic ethnicity, all people in this classification indicated that they were of Non-Hispanic ethnicity.
Information on race and ethnicity is often required for Federal programs and equal employment opportunities. Furthermore, measuring racial disparity is an important tool for policymakers in many areas including health, employment and income, and education.
Other Race Population
People who identify as "Other Race" belong to a single racial category that is different from those used by the Census Bureau ("White," "Black/African American," "American Indian/Alaska Native," "Asian," or "Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander").
The racial classifications used by the Census Bureau reflect a social definition of race recognized in the United States, not a biological, anthropological, or genetic definition. Furthermore, the Census definitions include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. While people may choose more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, all individuals in this classification have selected only "Other Race" as their race. When asked whether or not they were of Hispanic ethnicity, all people in this classification indicated that they were of Non-Hispanic ethnicity.
Information on race and ethnicity is often required for Federal programs and equal employment opportunities. Furthermore, measuring racial disparity is an important tool for policymakers in many areas including health, employment and income, and education.
Population of Two or More Races
People who identify as belonging to two or more races selected multiple racial categories on the Census, which could be categories used by the Census Bureau ("White," "Black/African American," "American Indian/Alaska Native," "Asian," and "Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander") or some other race. When asked whether or not they were of Hispanic ethnicity, all people in this classification indicated that they were of Non-Hispanic ethnicity.
The racial classifications used by the Census Bureau reflect a social definition of race recognized in the United States, not a biological, anthropological, or genetic definition. Furthermore, the Census definitions include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups.
Information on race and ethnicity is often required for Federal programs and equal employment opportunities. Furthermore, measuring racial disparity is an important tool for policymakers in many areas including health, employment and income, and education.
White Population
The Census Bureau defines "White" as "a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa. It includes people who indicate their race as 'White' or report entries such as Irish, German, Italian, Lebanese, Arab, Moroccan, or Caucasian."
The racial classifications used by the Census Bureau reflect a social definition of race recognized in the United States, not a biological, anthropological, or genetic definition. Furthermore, the Census definitions include racial and national origin or sociocultural groups. While people may choose more than one race to indicate their racial mixture, all individuals in this classification have selected only "White" as their race. When asked whether or not they were of Hispanic ethnicity, all people in this classification indicated that they were of Non-Hispanic ethnicity.
Information on race and ethnicity is often required for Federal programs and equal employment opportunities. Furthermore, measuring racial disparity is an important tool for policymakers in many areas including health, employment and income, and education.
Back to Demography
Download the Dataset