Learn More: Part I Crimes

Metadata

Variable Definitions:
Part I Property Crimes: The number of Part I property crimes per committed 1000 people; including burglary, larceny theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson
Part I Violent Crimes: The number of Part I violent crimes committed per 1000 people; including murder and non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, aggravated assault, and robbery

Sources:
Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD), Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department (LASD)
Years Available:
2012 - 2016
Geographic Unit:
Census Tracts in the City of Los Angeles, unincorporated areas, and the 40 cities that contract with LASD for municipal police services. Census tracts in cities that have their own municipal police force (other than LAPD) are not included.  
Other Notes: 
Crimes are labelled and classified according to FBI Uniform Crime reporting standards by the LAPD and LASD. 

Why are these Variables Important to Measure?

Part I Property Crimes
The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program of the FBI divides criminal offenses into two groups: Part I and Part II Crimes. Part I Crimes are serious crimes that occur with regularity in all areas of the country and are likely to be reported to the police. The UCR collects information on the age, sex, and race of people arrested for Part I Crimes. 
Part I Property Crimes include burglary, larceny theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. The presence of property crime in a neighborhood can cause mental distress in residents and may impact property values in an area. 
Part I Violent Crimes
The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program of the FBI divides criminal offenses into two groups: Part I and Part II Crimes. Part I Crimes are serious crimes that occur with regularity in all areas of the country and are likely to be reported to the police. The UCR collects information on the age, sex, and race of people arrested for Part I Crimes. Part I Violent Crimes include murder and non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, aggravated assault, and robbery.
Exposure to violent crime can significantly hinder psychological, social and academic development in children and leaves them at a higher risk of committing violence in the future. Individuals living in high-crime areas may be less likely to spend time outdoors and foster social connectedness with neighbors.
Rates of violent crime significantly vary across neighborhoods and are often related to poverty rates, job access, segregation, and residential stability among many other factors. Neighborhoods segregated along race and economic lines tend to have higher rates of violent crime, which often hinder economic and institutional investment in an area.

Sources:
Maximino, Martin. "The impact of crime on property values: Research roundup." Journalist's Resource, 12 March 2014. Link
"Neighborhoods and Violent Crime." Evidence Matters: Transforming Knowledge Into Housing and Community Development Policy. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development: Office of Policy Development and Research, Summer 2016. Link
"UCR Offense Definitions." Uniform Crime Reporting Statistics. United States Department of Justice: Federal Bureau of Investigation, 26 January 2017. Link
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