Learn More: Immigration

Metadata

Variable Definitions:
Immigrant Citizen Population: The percentage of total immigrants who are United States citizens
Immigrants Entering U.S. by Decade (4): The number of immigrants who entered the U.S. in each of the following time periods:
  • Before 1990
  • 1990 - 1999
  • 2000 - 2009
  • 2010 or Later
Immigrant Non-Citizen Population: The percentage of total immigrants who are not United States citizens
Total Immigrant Population: The percentage of the total population that are immigrants, including those who are U.S. citizens and those who are not
Source:
American Community Survey, 5-year estimates, Tables B05001 & B05005
Years Available:
2006-10, 2007-11, 2008-12, 2009-13, 2010-14, 2011-15, 2012-16
Geographic Unit
Census Tract

Why are these Variables Important to Measure?

Immigrant Citizen Population
Immigrants who are United States citizens are people who were born in another country and have become naturalized citizens in the United States, a process that often takes several years to complete. U.S. Citizenship offers many privileges including the ability to vote in elections, run for office, receive federal benefits and scholarships, travel overseas for extended periods of time, and sponsor other family members for green card status.
Measuring the number of immigrants who are citizens is important for understanding processes like immigration reform and voter registration. Additionally, citizenship is a good measure of how well we are integrating immigrant populations into our communities.
Immigrants Entering U.S. by Decade
The population of immigrants includes permanent residents with authorization documents, temporary migrants such as foreign students, humanitarian migrants such as refugees, migrants without authorization documents, and migrants who are now naturalized citizens.
Measuring the number of immigrants arriving in our communities by decade is important for understanding immigration patterns across time. When used in conjunction with other variables like linguistic isolation and English learner reclassification, it is a useful tool for understanding how well we are socially and economically integrating immigrant populations into our communities.
Immigrant Non-Citizen Population
Immigrants who are not United States citizens includes permanent residents with authorization documents, temporary migrants such as foreign students, humanitarian migrants such as refugees, and migrants without authorization documents. Should an individual complete the naturalization process to become a citizen, they would no longer be counted under this classification. U.S. Citizenship offers many privileges including the ability to vote in elections, run for office, receive federal benefits and scholarships, travel overseas for extended periods of time, and sponsor other family members for green card status.
Measuring the number of immigrants who do not have citizenship status is important for understanding processes like immigration reform and voter registration. Additionally, citizenship is a good measure of how well we are integrating immigrant populations into our communities.
Total Immigrant Population
The total immigrant population includes both citizen and non-citizen immigrants. Understanding the percentage of a given area that is made up of immigrants can be helpful in determining what types of services are needed to help immigrant populations integrate into society such as English as a Second Language Classes and voter registration.  
This variable could be used in conjunction with variables like linguistic isolation, overcrowded households and median household income to paint a picture about how areas with large immigrant populations are faring compared to those with large non-immigrant populations. 
Back to Demography
Download the Dataset