Learn More: Households

The Households dataset contains the following five variables: Average Household Size, Children in Family Households, Children in Non-Family Households, Children in Single-Parent Households, and Non-Family Households. Below is a chart showing neighborhoods in Los Angeles County with the highest and lowest percentages of children living in single-parent households. 
Browse this Learn More page to see this dataset's metadata and why each of its variables are important to measure.

Trends in the Data

Metadata

Variable Definitions:
Average Household Size: The average number of people living in a household
Children in Family Households: The percentage of total children under the age of 18 who live in a family household
Children in Non-Family Households: The percentage of total children under the age of 18 who do not live in a family household
Children in Single-Parent Households: The percentage of total children under the age of 18 who live with only one parent
Non-Family Households: The percentage of total households that are non-family households
Source:
American Community Survey, 5-year estimates, Tables S1101 & B09005
Years Available:
2006-10, 2007-11, 2008-12, 2009-13, 2010-14, 2011-15
Geographic Unit:
Census Tract

Why are these Variables Important to Measure?

Average Household Size
A household is defined in the American Community Survey as all the people who occupy a housing unit, which can be a house, an apartment, a mobile home, or any other space that is occupied as separate living quarters. Since households can be occupied by single or multiple families, groups of unrelated people, or single persons, it is important to specify the type of living arrangement that characterizes them. 
Household size is important to measure to aid in understanding the living conditions and quality of life of the inhabitants of a neighborhood. This, in turn, can help identify problems such as overcrowding, rent burden, and shortages in housing supply; informing the design of interventions to address them.
Children in Family Households
A household is defined in the American Community Survey as all the people who occupy a housing unit, which can be a house, an apartment, a mobile home, or any other space that is occupied as separate living quarters. Since households can be occupied by single or multiple families, groups of unrelated people, or single persons, it is important to specify the type of living arrangement characterizes them. 
Family households are those where one or more several inhabitants are related to the householder by birth, marriage, or adoption. Understanding the percentage of children living in family households helps characterize the structure of families in a neighborhood, as well as their residential arrangements. This is is essential for the design and provision of services and government programs. 
Children in Non-Family Households
A household is defined in the American Community Survey as all the people who occupy a housing unit, which can be a house, an apartment, a mobile home, or any other space that is occupied as separate living quarters. Since households can be occupied by single or multiple families, groups of unrelated people, or single persons, it is important to specify the type of living arrangement that characterizes them. 
Non-family households are those where the householder lives alone or with non-relatives only. Children not related to members of their household by birth or adoption are considered foster children. Foster children are under the age of 21 and placed by the local government in a household to receive parental care, where they can live for up to a period of several years. Understanding the percentage of children living in non-family households helps assess the living conditions of children in a neighborhood, as well as their residential arrangements. This is is essential for the design and provision of services and government programs such as foster care, and to provide for children's educational and health needs. 
Children in Single-Parent Households
Households where children are living with only one parent can be comprised of solely the parent and children, or include other unrelated inhabitants as well. A household is defined in the American Community Survey as all the people who occupy a housing unit, which can be a house, an apartment, a mobile home, or any other space that is occupied as separate living quarters. Since households can be occupied by single or multiple families, groups of unrelated people, or single persons, it is important to specify the type of living arrangement that characterizes them. 
Understanding the percentage of children living in single parent households helps assess the living conditions of children in a neighborhood, as well as their residential arrangements. This is is essential for the design and provision of services, government programs, and provide for children's educational and health needs. 
Non-Family Households
A household is defined in the American Community Survey as all the people who occupy a housing unit, which can be a house, an apartment, a mobile home, or any other space that is occupied as separate living quarters. Since households can be occupied by single or multiple families, groups of unrelated people, or single persons, it is important to specify the type of living arrangement characterizes them.
Non-family households are those where the householder lives alone or with non-relatives only. Understanding the percentage of households that are "non-family" helps to characterize the demographic and residential profile of a neighborhood and to inform the provision of services and government programs.
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